The real dilemma zone is different for each driver, based on speed and distance from the light.
The real yellow dilemma zone is different for each driver, based on speed and distance from the light.

We’ve all been faced with the sometimes-impossible decision to stop or accelerate when approaching a yellow traffic light. 

UofL engineering professor Richard Li calls it the “yellow dilemma zone.” He and a team of UofL students are doing research on how to reduce the amount of cars in the yellow dilemma zone by either having a longer yellow light or a longer green light.

“Through this study we can better understand how a driver reacts during the yellow time and through their reaction and behavior data, we can better model the dilemma zone locations,” Li said. “We hope we can provide better dilemma zone protection and make it safer.”

Li says the real dilemma zone is different for each driver, based on speed and distance from the light.

Learn more about his team’s research in the video below: 

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Mark Hebert

Following a 28-year career as a radio and television reporter, Mark Hebert joined the University of Louisville as the Director of Media Relations in 2009, serving as the main spokesperson. In 2015, Mark was named Director of Programming and Production. He’s now producing and hosting a radio show about “all things UofL”, overseeing the university’s video and TV productions and promoting UofL’s research operation. Mark is best known for his 22 years as the political and investigative reporter for WHAS-TV in Louisville where he won numerous awards for breaking stories, exposing corruption and objectively covering Kentucky politics. In 2014, Mark was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.